USACE jurisdictional determination reviewable

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USACE Jurisdictional Determination Immediately Reviewable

USACE jurisdictional determination reviewable

In an 8-0 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that landowners can challenge U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (“USACE”) jurisdictional determinations under the Clean Water Act (“CWA”).  In United States Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes, the eight-Justice Supreme Court concluded that a jurisdictional determination issued by the USACE under the CWA constitute “final agency action” under the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”), which means those decisions can be immediately reviewed in court. USACE Jurisdictional Determination Under the CWA Hawkes


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U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals

Clean Water Rule Challenges to be heard by Sixth Circuit

Recently we reported on the stay issued by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to the Clean Water Rule.  The Clean Water Rule was challenged by a number of plaintiffs in various federal district courts and circuit courts around the country.  The plaintiffs filed petitions in both the district and circuit courts based upon what they allege is uncertainty about whether the adoption of the Clean Water Rule is within those actions that must be challenged in a U.S. Circuit


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USACE Section 404 Permit

Section 404 violation undisclosed in Favero

Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”) sets forth a program to regulate the discharge of dredged or fill material into the waters of the United States (“WOTUS”), including wetlands.  Section 404 regulates a number of activities in the WOTUS, including fill development, water resource projects (such as dams and levees), infrastructure development (such as highways and airports) and mining projects.  Before dredged or fill material may be discharged into the WOTUS a permit must be obtained, unless the


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2016 EPA Water Law

EPA issues final Clean Water Rule, but Sixth Circuit stays rule pending further determination

In the spring of 2015, the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (“USACE”) released the final Clean Water Rule in order “to clearly protect from pollution and degredation the streams and wetlands that form the foundation of the nation’s water resources.”  According to the EPA’s news release: The rule ensures that waters protected under the Clean Water Act are more precisely defined and predictably determined, making permitting less costly, easier, and faster for businesses and